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re: scenario design - Printable Version

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re: scenario design - Glint - 11-13-2011

Could anyone say what seems a good guideline to use when planning a scenario regarding front lines? For example, I've read that a battalion as a rule of thumb, would attack along a front a quarter to three-quarters of a mile and defend across a 1/2 mile to 1 and a 1/4 miles. Wondering what others use as a reference and what attack/defence fronts would generally apply for higher organisations?
Cheers! cheers


RE: re: scenario design - Glint - 11-14-2011

Help! I'd really like some response to this thread!


RE: scenario design - Ashcloud - 11-14-2011

(11-14-2011, 05:49 AM)Glint Wrote: Help! I'd really like some response to this thread!

I would also like to know the answer to this. And where can I find OOB's for actual battles that took place if I would want to start researching a scenario I would like to build?



RE: scenario design - Jason Petho - 11-14-2011

There's no simple answer for this, as the distances varied so much depending on location and time frame.

The best thing to do would be to find maps of the battle you are interested and determine the various frontage distances from those maps.

Finding books on the battle you are interested in would be the first start to determine the OOB. Additionally, you could try wikipedia for a quick overview.

Jason Petho




RE: scenario design - Ashcloud - 11-14-2011

(11-14-2011, 10:27 PM)Jason Petho Wrote: There's no simple answer for this, as the distances varied so much depending on location and time frame.

The best thing to do would be to find maps of the battle you are interested and determine the various frontage distances from those maps.

Finding books on the battle you are interested in would be the first start to determine the OOB. Additionally, you could try wikipedia for a quick overview.

Jason Petho

Thanks for the reply Jason - I was afraid you were going to say something like that (just no shortcuts are there).


RE: re: scenario design - Glint - 11-15-2011

I seem to remember having a book, ' German Army Handbook' I believe, (lost it in one of my many
moves). Had a load of info regarding defence lines, attack formations and much more. I'm sure there were books for other countries as well. Probably a heck of info available online as Jason says.
I was just interested in other members' views, especially those working alongside and within the H2H section.


RE: scenario design - Jason Petho - 11-15-2011

(11-15-2011, 12:10 AM)Glint Wrote: I seem to remember having a book, ' German Army Handbook' I believe, (lost it in one of my many
moves). Had a load of info regarding defence lines, attack formations and much more. I'm sure there were books for other countries as well.

Yes, they are handy for generalized average, but I recommend looking at the specific battles in question to find out actual specifics.

Jason Petho

(11-14-2011, 11:28 PM)Ashcloud Wrote: (just no shortcuts are there).

Rarely, very rarely indeed.

Jason Petho





RE: scenario design - Kool Kat - 11-15-2011

(11-15-2011, 12:10 AM)Glint Wrote: I was just interested in other members' views, especially those working alongside and within the H2H section.

Utilize online resources... consult you hard copy WW2 collections... take advantage of both public and university libraries - especially reference librarians... talk to vets who participated in the battle... etc.

I design either "semi-historical" or "hypothetical" scenarios so you use what you can locate on a specific or "what if?" battle... and than fill in the "blanks" with a best guess. :cool2:

My criteria for scenario design is to develop "fun" and "exciting" conflicts... that have a good replay factor.

Again, as Jason and others have stated earlier... there is no "magic" formula? :chin:






RE: scenario design - Glint - 11-15-2011

(11-15-2011, 01:32 AM)Kool Kat Wrote:
(11-15-2011, 12:10 AM)Glint Wrote: I was just interested in other members' views, especially those working alongside and within the H2H section.

Utilize online resources... consult you hard copy WW2 collections... take advantage of both public and university libraries - especially reference librarians... talk to vets who participated in the battle... etc.

I design either "semi-historical" or "hypothetical" scenarios so you use what you can locate on a specific or "what if?" battle... and than fill in the "blanks" with a best guess. :cool2:

My criteria for scenario design is to develop "fun" and "exciting" conflicts... that have a good replay factor.

Again, as Jason and others have stated earlier... there is no "magic" formula? :chin:

Thanks for the input KK and Jason. However, whilst appreciating your comments, if you are creating hypothetical scenarios, then surely a guideline is needed? For example, you wouldn't create a map around five miles square and put a corps oob in it? I've checked online and found the guidelines as in my original post, appreciate the input so far and respect the opinions, would just like to know what other 'hypothetical designers' work on?




RE: scenario design - Kool Kat - 11-15-2011

(11-15-2011, 12:10 AM)Glint Wrote: ...if you are creating hypothetical scenarios, then surely a guideline is needed?

You stay true to the game scale... and that is 250 meters / hex.

The CS User Manual recommends that when developing an Order of Battle (OOB), that the organizational structure be within a company or battalion size. It goes on to state that "...you build an organization with a battalion as the minimum organization." - CS User Manual 1.03 (Page 84).


(11-15-2011, 12:10 AM)Glint Wrote: For example, you wouldn't create a map around five miles square and put a corps oob in it?

No, of course not? It goes back to that previous thread on respecting and staying within the scale of the game? :chin:

Peter - it seems like you are trying to make this more difficult than it really is? Read up on a battle... find out all you can about it (forces, OOB, length, outcome, etc.)... create the map... generate the OOBs... play test it with multiple players... tweak the victory conditions... adjust the reinforcements... etc. and finish with a fun and exciting scenario?

I would wager that most battle accounts a designer would want to use would be smaller than corps sized ones... and would generally fall within the regiment or battalion-sized encounters? And regiment or battalion-sized battles are ideal for the CS game scale? :chin:

IMO, a good scenario design is as much an intuitive exercise as it is an exacting science. :smoke: